Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Ines: Jets locker room no haven for choir boys

By now you've heard of the Azteca TV reporter's complaints against the New York Jets. Did she set back American journalism or expose chauvinism in the locker room?
http://news.lalate.com/2010/09/13/ines-sainz-gives-photos-from-jets-controversy/

16 comments:

Dalton Hammonds said...

I think Ines Sainz should know what she is getting into if she's going to wear that type of attire into a National Football League locker room. She doesn't set American journalism back, however; she doesn't give a good reputation to women trying to be a professional reporter in the sports field.

Redbeard said...

I feel the Jets players should not have acted like children, however; she should also have understood that what she was wearing was a little risky. I don't think it sets journalism back at all but it will get her negative attention which equals publicity which was probably her goal.

CherieDavis said...

I think that it is her own fault. She should not expect to dress cheap and be treated that way, especially by a room full of football players. If she was dressed professionally and was harassed then she had a right to make a fuss about it, but she brought this on herself. She has pushed back the image of women sports journalists years.

Caroline said...

I think the comments made by the men in the locker room were most likely appropriate to the way Ines Sainz was dressed. She chose to dress provocatively and she should expect to receive provocative comments. I think she disgracefully gave female journalists a bad association.

PhillipsEdu said...

She is a reporter and was at work. I'm pretty sure that work is not a night club. She is dressed inappropriately and was basically asking for the attention. Once she had the attention of the football players, who have a right to voice their opinion, she didn't like what they were saying. This, I would say, did not set journalism back itself but has change the way one now looks at female reporters. Meaning, that now whatever some female repoter is wearing something that is nice and tasteful but it could be showing a little too much and she wont be taken seriously. It has just made it ten times as hard for women to prove the point that they can get the job done as well as a man.

Ashley Herrald said...

Ines Sainz should have known dressing like that would cause her to get unwanted/wanted attention. I mean, they are men, of course they are going to be "cat calling" or something like that if a woman decides to dress like that. I feel as if either she knew what she was doing to get attention or she isn't suitable for a professional position. You don't see Erin Andrews dressing in skimpy clothing. Sainz gives women reporters a bad name. I don't think it pushes American journalism back, it just makes people skeptical of female sports reporters. Maybe if Sainz would have kept her clothing classy and professional she would've received some classier, more respectable comments.

casey said...

Ines Sainz is not new to this game. She knew going to the field that her attire was not professional. If she can not be professional and respect herself enough to cover herself up, then she doesn't deserve to be respected back. As a female who would love to one day get to cover sports, I am disgusted at her poor choice. It is almost like she is making a mockery out of women sports reporters. It took so long to let women journalist in to the locker rooms and now this happens. It not only gives her a bad name, but women in sports journalism as well. It makes people question whether they should have given women the privilege to go in the locker room. I'm extremely disappointed.

CarverD said...

Has anyone seen the Esquire cover with Sainz? Please, if I didn't already think that before the controversy she already aspired to be a diva journalist, I might have just taken this a little more seriously. Not only did the Jets players not physically threaten Ines in any way, she put herself out on that plank with the way she was dressed. If you want respect Ms. Sainz, present yourself in a respectable way. She must have months away from doing a spread in Playboy with the way she looked in Esquire and Gente.

Brittany said...

Ines Sainz did not project a professional image at the Jets' game. This, of course, is not an excuse for the way the Jets players acted toward her, but I feel if she wanted to be treated as a professional journalist she should have dressed and acted the part. She posted pictures of herself on twitter in her suggestive outfit for everyone to see and also previously had provocative pictures of herself available to the public. She clearly wants attention in an inappropriate fashion which leads me to believe she really has no reason to be surprised or upset about the comments made toward her by the players. I don't think this incident affects journalism in anyway; it is too trivial.

RachelAnne said...

I feel that the reporter was looking for some sort of publicity or negative attention, because no female journalist that considers herself a professional would wear something like that and think that it's appropriate. I feel like she knew was she was doing and knew that inappropriate things would probably be said to her. I don't feel that the men in the football team were right to say anything to her to make her feel uncomfortable, but guys will be guys, even professional football players I suppose. I feel that it does set journalism or at least female journalists back. Our job is not to distract or seek attention on ourselves, we cover the stories rather than start them or become involved in them.

Trevan said...

I believe that Sainz is setting back journalism in a sense because of the clothing she was wearing. This brought forth more attention to the fact that some women journalists are sex symbols. Erin Andrews for instance, did not plan on having herself videotaped through a peephole of a hotel bathroom. The question remains though, did her popularity increase because of the incident? I believe the same goes for Ines Sainz.

Creative Commonplace said...

When I awoke this morning and heard that Ines Sainz, a Mexican reporter, wore provocative clothing to a Jets game and then complained about getting sexually harassed in the men's locker room,I was ashamed. First off, why would any reporter wear tight-fitting jeans and a short-cut top which shows off the stomach to a sporting event? Ines should have dressed up and should have portrayed herself to have had an important role - like reporting on an NFL Game!!! Second, why would she walk into the locker room full with guys to begin with? If she wanted an interview, she should have stayed outside and not into a room full with players getting dressed and showered. I mean, guys will be guys when an attractive woman enters the room - of course there will be whistles and sexual comments. Third, in all seriousness, Ines wanted publicity. I think she wore what she did to get noticed, walked into the locker room to get noticed, and then told the media that she was harassed by the players in order for her to get TV time such as a booking on the Today Show. The pieces fit the puzzle.
I think she definitely put a bad reputation on female journalists. I do not think people will take them serious enough anymore which will ultimately hurt the media companies and the female journalists. I hope that society overlooks this and realizes that one female reporter doesn't speak for the entire flock.
Also, I think that the NFL should institute a dress code by which all reporters must follow. I mean, she possibly could have put a bad reputation on the Jets team, who knows. I think restrictions need to occur in order for this not to happen anymore. That's It.

Chris Swindell said...

Even though Dean Dooley and I regularly agree on matters of male behavior, I have to say on this one, we disagree. Heck, I'm a happily married man and I did a double take. I believe women should be able to dress as they please without fear of harrassment. BUT, this attire is not professional. The locker room has not always been a welcoming place for women. That's unfortunate. But, this one woman's appearance sets back the whole cause. I'll go out on a limb. The Jets should not apologize. Ines should. Come on.

Courtney Williamson said...

Inez Sainz should know better. You can't expect to walk into a locker room, partially clothed, and not expect to receive some type of attention; whether good or bad. I do not believe her actions reflect American journalism as a whole. However, I do think it makes women journalists look like they cannot play the part. Sainz looks the fool by not being professional. Because of her wardrobe malfunction, or lapse in positive choices, it is up to female reporters everywhere to prove their professionalism.

Megan S. said...

When you see other female sports journalists on the sidelines, they are always dressed in appropriate work attire. What Inez Sainz was wearing,was not appropriate attire for any workplace, except maybe a dance or strip club. What she was wearing made her lose all credibility, and made me embarrassed for other female journalists. What happened in the locker room, even though it was wrong, was completely justified for what she was wearing. It almost seemed as though she was welcoming the negative attention, and that this was an outcome that she was hoping for.

katie olszeski said...

Inez Sainz clearly wanted attention dressing like that , and she got it. I think that her choice of clothing was totally inappropriate and she knew that . The fact that she then complained about what football players said to her I honestly thought was obnoxious. She knew that she was dressing to get more attention then the other women there.

And i don't think that she set back female journalist but more the fact that she totally set herself back and made a joke of herself. Good luck ever getting to cover sports again.

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